The 10 Best Hotels in Mallorca For Gypsy Souls

It is no longer a secret that I am a Gypsy Soul, I love to travel and I developed my nomadic soul definitely while living here on Mallorca. The past few months on this beautiful island have been a blessing and I have had the opportunity to visit many of its beautiful villages, beaches, restaurants and hotels. Today I want to share with you the hotels that I enjoyed most, based on the price, atmosphere, location, view, service, … you name it!

Time to explore some of the best hotels on Mallorca for Gypsy Souls!

This is my Top 10*:

  1. Cook’s Club, Palma Beach
  2. Hotel Mama, Palma de Mallorca
  3. Hotel Bella Colina, Paguera
  4. Hotel Sa Baronia, Banyalbufar
  5. Bikini Island & Mountain Resort, Port de Soller
  6. Hotel Dalt Muntanya, Orient
  7. Pension Bellavista, Port de Pollenca
  8. Boutique Hotel Jardi d’Arta, Arta
  9. Som Suret Cool Hotel, Portopetro
  10. Cal Reiet Holistic Retreats, Santanyi

*The hotels are not listed in order of preference.

1: Cook’s Club Palma Beach, Playa de Palma

OKAY, I work for Thomas Cook. That is no longer a secret. But… It is not because I work for Thomas Cook that I am going to list all Thomas Cook hotels here. No. I have carefully tested some of their branded hotels and resorts (such as this Cook’s Club Palma Beach), and this came out as my favorite one for gypsy souls (& digital nomads too, because it offers a co-working space!).

Cook’s Club is a new hotel chain with hotels opening all around the world for the new Millenial generation. It focuses on good music, street food on demand, great cocktails at the pool bar and chilled-out vibes. It also has a much more trendy and comfy vibes than any other typical holiday hotels that you will find in Playa de Palma (or tourist resorts), so if you’re looking for a beach holiday spot to crash, this is it! 

PS: Palma is only 1 bus ride of €1,50 away (so it’s also great for a city trip & beach getaway)!

2: Hotel Mama, Palma de Mallorca

If you want to stay in the city of Palma de Mallorca where the buzz is really going, then I completely understand. I am in LOVE with this city (ever since I started living here since March 2019). Although I do not need to sleep in hotels here (because I have a place to live), I do like to go check out other hotels, such as Hotel Mama, and particularly their rooftop terraces and pools. Yes, I am addicted to living a high-society life… 😉

One of the most chilled-out, highly From Julie With Love – styled design hotels in the city is Hotel Mama. That is: Artisan tiles, collector furniture, natural light and inspired by styles ranging from Art Deco to oriental influences! YES, make yourself at home here! Mama will take care of you, whether it is in one of the 6 different kind of prestigious room types, at the tapas bar or in the Grand Café, Hotel Mama is a pearl in the city (with great views over the cathedral and historic town)!

One more reason to visit Hotel Mama for me is the unique cinema experience that it offers with Cappucine: the hotel offers you to enjoy both vintage and contemporary films in a magical cinema inspired by some famous paintings that will brings you back to 1920s Paris. This is an extremely exclusive and comfortable movie theatre, that has screenings Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 5PM with only 30 seats. Original version with subtitles in Spanish. Bookings through the reception. 

3: Hotel Bella Colina, Paguera

A bit more to the West side of Mallorca, not particularly my favorite part of the island with party places for English and German tourists, there are some exceptions to the rule. Luckily! The reopened Bella Colina Vintage Hotel est. 1953 is one of those places that magically sets new standards and belongs to the most beautiful houses in the region.

It is located on a privileged hill-site in Paguera and therefore has a panoramic view of the Mediterranean Sea and the surrounding mountains. I am absolutely amazed by the happy and colorful vintage design of the lounge and the restaurant. Hotel Bella Colina So colorful that I cannot resist… Who would not love to spend some time there?! This is a place that will make you happy!

All rooms have airconditioning and there is also a swimming pool, a lounge and a pool bar with cocktails, snacks and relaxed music. Hammock spotted as well! Gosh, what a place!

4: Pension Sa Baronia, Banyalbufar

If you are looking for a place to relax and enjoy one of the best sunsets on the island, in my opinion, there is no better place than Pension Sa Baronia. For a really affordable price (I paid only 90 euros for a double room for 2 persons including breakfast in high season), you get to unwind completely and forget about all your sorrows.

My friends called me crazy when I said I was going to Banyalbufar – a really small village in the Sierra de Tramuntana – but I turned out to be right: it is an ideal place to relax after hiking or cycling, and there are some places to visit nearby, such as Torre del Verger (one of my Top 10 Instagram Spots on the island).

An absolutely gorgeous swimming pool located on the hill-side edge offers stunning views over the rural terraces and Mediterranean Sea whereas the hotel Sa Baronia itself is located in a 17thcentury old stately home.

5: Bikini Island & Mountain Hotel, Port de Soller

LIFE IS BETTER IN BIKINI, they say at Bikini Island & Mountain Hotel. Okay, this might not be the cheapest option of this hotel list, but it is on my ultimate Mallorca Bucket List ever since I got to the island and discovered the happy rainbow staircase of this hotel in Port de Soller.

One obligation: “If you’re going to Bikini, be sure to wear flowers in your hair.You’re going to meet some gentle people there!” it reads on the ground before entering the staircase. So, don’t break the rule and go 100% for your GIPSY SOUL outfit and mindset. Well yeah, after all… There are nice places, great places and there’s the Bikini Island & Mountain Hotel Port de Sóller

PS: Make sure to eat at the incredible NENI Mallorca restaurant and enjoy the views over the port of Port de Soller. And oh yeah… of course, they also organize yoga retreats here!

6: Hotel Dalt Muntanya, Orient

Sometimes all you have to do is get away from it all. Go OFF THE BEATEN TRACK and head into the heart of the Serra de Tramuntana, declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. to discover Hotel Dalt Muntanya. It is the home of tranquillity itself in perfect harmony with nature. Few hotels will feel so cosy and personal as this one. 

Relax at the beautiful pool and enjoy some of the best hidden restaurants of the island, such as Restaurant Mandala, or go for a degustation menu in the neighboring hotel Son Palau. Jummie! And romantic (even if you don’t have a boyfriend, but just bring a friend, like I did).

7: Pension Bellvista, Port de Pollenca

Pension Bellavista is an oasis for budget-lovers on Mallorca, located in the heart of Puerto Pollensa. I challenge you to propose a better hotel than this one for this price-quality on the island. This place is the best of the best deal! It has no swimming pool, but it has an on-site vegan and vegetarian restaurant (and that is unique for Spanish meatlovers) with tested and approved meals by From Julie with Love. 

Pension Bella Vista is a family-run pension and the owners has a big heart for animals. They are active in animal shelters on the island and therefore only accept animal-loving-guests. Yes, one cat accidentally jumped into my room from the balcony and decided to sleep next to me. I just enjoyed my one-night stand! 😀 

PS: As it is located right by the bus stop, it is a perfect base to explore the North of Mallorca with beautiful beaches like Playa de Muro, the famous Cap de Formentor, the historic city of Alcudia, and a direct connection to the airport… all by bus! 

8: Hotel Jardi d’Arta, Arta

Voltaire once said: “The paradise on earth is where I am”. Well, maybe he was at Hotel Jardi d’Arta, a hotel with a stunning Arabic garden and still enough Mallorcan soul to feed your hunger for Mediterranean flavours. This is one of the most charming town hotels on the island, and conveniently located in the heart of the town of Arta but also a short ride away from many beaches in the North East.

There are only 9 lovingly designed rooms and 3 suites in this boutique hotel, so each of them have their own unique character. I can’t help but dream away when looking at its pool by sunset. Isn’t this a piece of heaven on earth? Yes, sometimes dreams come true.

9: Som Suret Cool Hotel, Portopetro

On the east side of the island of Mallorca, you will find tons of hotel resorts that are packed with tourists on crowded beaches. The Som Suret Cool Hotel, also known as the former Varadero Hotel is a break of that trend on the east coast. It is Adults Only (yes, sorry, but if you’re on a holiday without children, you most likely prefer also not to be surrounded by children, especially at the pool). 

Hotel Som Suret is situated just a few meters from a traditional maritime port and offers a bit of a different and exclusive holiday experience for a short escape or a holiday with its incredible rooftop Ibiza-style white lounge, beautiful views and comfortable beds. And all of this at very affordable prices, which is probably one of my main reasons to choose for this hotel: price according to quality!

10: Cal Reiet Holistic Retreats, Santanyi 

If it can be a little bit more, and if you are looking for a holistic wellbeing retreat instead of a ‘normal’ holiday as a gypsy soul, then Cal Reiet is maybe something for you! I would actually not really call this a hotel, as the idea is to come here to restore yourself in a special environment with treatments, massages and special body, mind and spirit offerings on the menu. 

For Cal Reiet, holistic living is all about the lifestyle, and the property breaths that ideology. Whether you come as an individual or in a group retreat, you will be pampered for sure here. Cal Reiet is an oasis away from everyday life where you can rejuvenate, grow and reconnect with your true-self. Its aim is to create a magical place, where guests can find inspiration, joy and harmony within.

Reservations

If you book through this link via Booking.com, you get 15 euros discount (after your stay) and me too! So please, use it wisely… and let me know how your trip to Mallorca was. Or if you have another hotel tip to share.

Have a nice time in Mallorca, you gypsy soul!

x x x From Julie with Love x x x

The 10 Most Instagrammable Places in Mallorca

Mallorca is filled with the most beautiful Instagram places and photographic opportunities. Just take a look at my Instagram profile and you’ll immediately see that I can continue to take photos FOREVER on this amazing island. From small villages to rocky bays and fancy restaurants…. Mallorca has it all!

This blog post is all about the best places to Instagram in Mallorca. I will show you my favorite shot spots on the island: some are popular places, others are off the beaten track. Up to you to discover them yourself now. And Psssss….. let me know what your Top 10 looks like (in a comment below)!

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7 Reasons Why Enotourism is the New Travel Trend for Wine Lovers

Admit it. You like to drink a good glass of wine, especially when you are on a holiday, on a day off, or after work. With fish, with desert, with BBQ, … There is always an appropriate wine and an appropriate occasion to drink wine, unless you are pregnant, religious, or a member of the AA.

This blog post is for the wine lovers who want to indulge even more in their obsession with wine. Imagine that you could not only taste wines, but also learn about its consumption and purchase wine while you travel at or near its source. Imagine that you could visit wineries, make vineyard walks or even participate in harvesting the grapes. Well, imagine that is nowadays called enotourism, or wine tourism.

Keep reading to find out WHY enotourism is the new travel trend!

“I’ve never owned a vineyard, but I’m pretty sure I’ve drunk one”.

– From Julie With Love

This week I tried out Enotourism in Mallorca, because, you know… I am getting a bit spoilt… When you spend a lot of time on an island, you kind of want something else than beaches, hikes, city trips and boat rides all the time. I was looking for a different experience on the island, and that’s how I bumped into this wine experience! Here follow 7 reasons why it is the new travel trend!

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What I Learned From Being a Volunteer Tourist Abroad

**SPOILER ALERT: THIS IS AN OPINION / LONG READ ARTICLE **

After having worked in the volunteer tourism industry in Ecuador and Cambodia, I realized that if I really wanted to make a meaningful difference, I should be writing about volunteer tourism and researching the phenomenon rather than to do the actual volunteer work. So I started to conduct research on the phenomenon in Cuba. For now, my own research is done (and compiled in some articles and a Masters’ thesis), but for some the research continues…

Recently I got contact by Julia Rommel, a student at ‘iba’ Internationale Berufsakademie Köln in Germany. She is currently conducting research for her own thesis on “Volunteer-Tourism as a form of travel in context of development cooperation – a critical analysis of assorted characteristics, development possibilities and effects of the view of the various involved participants”. She asked me if she could interview me about my own personal experiences. It turned out to be a very meaningful reflection for myself again, and I realize I should keep sharing what I have learned from volunteering abroad. 

So here’s to all who consider to volunteer abroad. Julia and I wanted to share the interview online so that we could raise awareness and open a public discussion. 

Continue reading if you want to know: 

  • How the involvement in the projects can be envisioned locally on the spot.
  • What exactly I did in Ecuador and Cambodia
  • Which impact volunteering abroad had on my personal life 
  • How I finance my trips abroad
  • What I think is the best way to organize a volunteer trip
  • How I really think about volunteer tourism

Please share your comments after reading. We love to hear from you and who knows… it can help Julia to collect more research data for her thesis!

1. What do you personally find fascinating about travelling?

I love to travel because it allows me to see different parts of the world and de-familiarize my own culture, habits, world views and so on. You can meet new people, discover new places, eat different foods, see other types of architectures and religions, and so on. Traveling is part of my personal development because it turns you into a different person after: in my case, traveling has made me feel more open-minded, conscious, knowledgeable, confident, adventurous, flexible, social, assertive and open towards a multi-cultural society.

Travel far enough, you meet yourself.

David Mitchell

I feel also that travel gave me more understanding of life outside my own bubble (village), but also about political and religious issues, such as climate change, female circumcision, prostitution and illiteracy. By experiencing things first-hand or witnessing situations you often learn a lot more than from reading it in books or hearing about it on tv or in the university. Simultaneously, you get to know yourself better because you obviously start to question your own life, conditions and ways of seeing or thinking. This is why I like traveling so much. 

Moreover, I love photography and writing so I love traveling because it is beautiful to go somewhere for photographic reasons or to write about places for my travel blog. On top of that, traveling allows you to learn languages and practices your language skills better than any course can do. I have learned basic Spanish at school, but it was only by studying in Spain, doing my internship in Ecuador, conducting research in Cuba and working in Mallorca that I could become so fluent in it.

Lastly, because travel is so adventurous and challenging at times, it gives you an adrenaline rush. Therefore, I would say that travel becomes an addiction. You always want to see more places, travel more often, do it again and again. For me, it is very hard to settle in a small Belgian village now that I have travelled to so many places and lived abroad for so many times and so long. I am so used to having stories to tell, to get inspired by the things I encounter along the way. I just love it!

2. Where do you currently work and live?

I currently live in Palma de Mallorca where I work for Thomas Cook in Destination Management. This is a temporary contract for the Summer Season from March until October. I chose this job because I wanted to live on a Spanish island in the sun under good working conditions (apartment, salary, insurance, …) but I am not sure yet if I will want to or can stay in the company. I am thinking of going on a Working Holiday Visa (WHV) to Australia before I get 30 (I’m 27 now) so that I can travel while working in Oceania as well, but the plan is not concretized yet.

3. How do you define „Volunteer Tourism“?

For me, volunteer tourism is the travel that includes some activities of volunteering. Ideally, it should represent a balance between a holiday (tourism) and volunteering (work), but often this is not the case. Usually, it tends to focus more on the touristic part of the trip. We must not forget that tourism is an economy (providing a product or service in return for money), whereas volunteering is usually associated with altruism (doing something good without expecting something in return for it). My thesis deals with the contradiction between profit-seeking activities and charitable generosity. Nowadays, any kind of touristic activity that includes volunteerism can be considered volunteer tourism.

For a detailed conceptualization of the term ‘volunteer tourism’ I refer to chapter 2.1 in my Master’s thesis (p.22) ‘Why Don’t You Give Me Some Love – An anthropological examination of the intimate relationship between volunteer tourism and jineterismo in Cuba’ and a paper I wrote ‘PLEASE MIND THE GAP! (In-) Consistency in Gap Year Volunteer Tourism’.  

4. From March until June and from June until August 2014 you worked as a project coordinator and group leader for volunteers in Cambodia and Ecuador. How can I envision the involvement in the projects locally on the spot?

What exactly did you do there? Were the projects comparable? Do they have something to do with Volunteer Tourism? Tell me about your experiences and about the volunteers that had applied for the voluntary work.

Yes, indeed. I worked in Ecuador and Cambodia as a volunteer group leader for a gap year company in the UK in 2014. I also participated in a volunteer brigade in Cuba for my Master’s thesis research in 2016.

Ecuador

I worked for the Yanapuma Foundation in Ecuador. This is a grassroots, self-sustaining NGO in Ecuador that works with a number of rural, indigenous and marginalized communities on sustainable development projects in the areas of health, education and agriculture. As part of its long-term goals to assist local communities adapt to an increasingly globalised world while promoting and preserving their culture, Yanapuma provides economic, material and human resources so that they may partake in social development projects within their communities.

An important aspect of my work at Yanapuma Foundation was the provision of international volunteers for both short and long-term periods (from one week to six months) to assist these communities with their goals. The NGO receive groups of volunteers from The Leap Gap Years Overseas between 18-22 years old from gap year programs several times per year, particularly for 6 to 10-week programs.

My responsibilities were to maintain in contact with the volunteer coordinator at the office to organize logistics and plan the project prior to their arrival. I had to receive the group upon arrival and be their leader through most of their time with Yanapuma in Ecuador. This included traveling with the group and living with them on site to participate in their project work and coordinate accommodation, food, and extra activities. I was serving as the principal English/Spanish translator between the group and local project coordinators. I also managed money for group expenses such as bus tickets and I made expense reports at the end of each phase. I was the point-of-contact between the group and the Yanapuma office in case of problems or concerns, and I was overseeing the health and wellbeing of the group, during their time with Yanapuma and react in case of emergency. I provided weekly updates describing group activities and/or any health issues.

As a Volunteer Group Leader I had to motivate, manage and lead these groups in different locations around Ecuador. Locations included Quito, Otavalo, indigenous communities, Baños, Quilotoa, and Riobamba. The programs included a mix of community volunteering and tourism. As a group leader, I lived with the group. In the indigenous communities, everyone lived in volunteer cabins, and while in Quito and traveling to other destinations we stayed in hostels.

Chilcapamba

Cambodia

In Cambodia, I was contracted by Indochina Adventures, Co. Ltd., a tour operator based in Siem Reap since 1999. I worked for them as a Volunteer Group Leader for similar volunteer groups as in Ecuador sent by The Leap Gap Years Overseas. Indochina Adventures is, in contrary to Yanapuma Foundation, not an NGO. It is a commercial tour operator specialized in cycling and trekking, but the company also offers bird watching, photography tours and volunteer programs.

Indochina Adventures is a local travel company that actively participates in country development and helps the Cambodian community as it strongly believes that local people are the people who should get the most income from tourism. The founders recommend tourists to sleep in home stays, to eat delicious local food such as Amok, to support the floating school at Tonle Sap lake by providing school kits, and so on. Indochina Adventures strongly believes that poor schoolchildren with better education will have a better future. In addition, it supports some of the NGOs to help the kids with HIV/AIDS, it also support the Trailblazer Foundation to provide water filter for ‘the poorfamilies’ (quoted from their website). 

Comparison – Difference in Projects

My job role in Cambodia was similar to that in Ecuador. The difference is probably most in the nature of the projects. Hereby a list of the various project I worked on:

Ecuador – Chilcapamba

The Chilcapamba Community is located near Otavalo in the Andes, two hours north of Quito. The region is a center of indigenous culture in Ecuador and continues today the production of world-renowned handicrafts. Many indigenous communities in the area still face economic hardship and erosion of their culture. The community of Chilcapamba is working hard to preserve their language and identity, whilst still participating in modern Ecuadorian life through education and the development of sustainable industries. There are approximately 100 families in the community and they are currently undertaking a range of projects in the areas of education, development, sustainable agriculture and the preservation of indigenous culture. 

In the mornings we were helping with a variety of projects. Activities included digging irrigation ditches, clearing rocks and planting trees. Volunteers also cleared weeds near future garden sites, helped to maintain existing gardens, worked on construction in the community centre or helped out in the local school. In the afternoons, volunteers had group Spanish classes for 2 hours in the community.

Ecuador – Tsachila Community

In the lowland jungle there was another volunteer project with the Tsachila community. Here we did a number of cultural activities and got to know the community. The volunteers have participated in expanding the cultural centre and the cacao cooperative. They have helped to reforest the area, maintained the botanical gardens and constructed additional tourist cabins and classrooms for the local school. 

Projects included planting hundreds of cocoa plants (3 days a week) and constructing small plant nurseries for a number of the families (the other 2 days of the week) so that they could easily care for the crops that they grow from the beginning. Volunteers also had the opportunity to immerse themselves in the Tsachila culture with afternoon activities such as making artisan crafts, painting your hair bright red with achiote paste and learning how to play Marimba (typical instrument).

Ecuador – Hacienda Tranquila

In the Galapagos Islands, I took the volunteers to Hacienda Tranquila. The Hacienda is located in the highlands of the island, on a 50-hectare site, where there is still native vegetation. The main objective of the project was to develop the technology to reconstruct native habitat in the highlands on San Cristobal, and to serve as a centre for similar projects in the highlands of other populated islands in the Galapagos chain. We worked to reverse the negative effects of invasive or introduced species, restoring the native and endemic forests of San Cristobal. This means much of your time was spent cutting down invasive species such as blackberry bushes and in turn planting tree species native to the islands. Afternoons were spent working in the organic garden: watering plants, weeding, and caring for the baby plants in the nursery.

On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, special needs children from the community came to the Hacienda and the volunteers assisted them in a form of therapy in which the children ride horses. Finally, volunteers took care of the animals on the hacienda which include cows and chickens. 

Cambodia – Water Project

Despite its beautiful exterior, Siem Reap is one of the poorest regions in Cambodia, a town the difference between rich and poor is stark. The illegal slum settlements which perch on the polluted riverside are a stones throw from luxurious 5* hotels with their turquoise swimming pools and overflowing breakfast buffets. Communities of displaced people, army families, victims of landmines and sex-workers live in deep poverty with little access to education or basic amenities – tucked out of sight of the cities’ affluent tourists. It is estimated that only half the population have access to clean water and less than a quarter have access to a toilet. With the volunteers’ help, Indochina Adventures aimed to build functioning wells and flushing toilets to service these communities and, in the process, help to restore health and dignity to people too often overlooked by the authorities. 

The mornings were spent with a team of local construction workers, digging, mixing cement, helping to lay pipes and installing water pump kits.

Cambodia – Orphanage Project

In the afternoons volunteers joined forces with the Cambodia Development Organisation (CDO) who provide a home for orphaned and poor children. Founded by a local Cambodian in 2006 CDO provides children at risk with vital shelter, protection, food and education for people who need it most. The centre is situated 7km East of Siem Reap and comprises basic accommodation, classrooms, performance spaces and outside play areas for 30-40 children at a time. Volunteers assisted the centre with improvements to the buildings, interact with, feed and teach kids English whilst supporting CDO financially through the donation Indochina Adventures made on their behalf. 

Cambodia – Eco-Agriculture Project

Another morning project included the immersion in a rural farming community in Samrong village near Siem Reap, where subsistence rice farmers still live in wooden houses on stilts and children catch fish with simple wooden rods. Like many small, traditional agricultural communities the people of Samrong were, until recently, entirely dependent on the rice harvest for their livelihoods. The grain forms the basis of their diet and any additional rice left over after the community have used their share is sold for a small profit to purchase other foods, pay for education and health care. 

However, unpredictable weather conditions and the fluctuating value of rice on the market has left them vulnerable. Now with the help of local NGOs the village is working hard to diversify into other areas to have a more stable income and range of crops, increase their farming areas and productivity and have even built a communal rice store to make their harvest go further. Volunteers assisted the community with harvesting, infrastructure projects and a variety of income generating schemes, such as basket weaving and making incense sticks.

Cambodia – Teaching English

In the afternoons, volunteers worked with school children at a local school in Siem Reap while teaching English, which focused on education as a means of breaking the poverty cycle in the area. The school provided social care and aimed to improve access to education for around 1,500 disadvantaged children and young adults in their area and have a variety of incredible community projects that volunteers can get involved with. From sports coaching to painting or construction, helping out in organic farms or delivering English lessons – volunteers supported the work of the school and got to know the incredible young people they work with.

Cambodia – Children’s Painting Project ‘Let Us Create’

Let Us Create (LUC) is a day centre that provides nutritional food, clean drinking water, educational enrichment, and a creative outlet for over 100 registered children in Sihanoukville. This community group of children comes from very poor backgrounds, and many of them scavenge through garbage bins or sell souvenirs to tourists on the beach to help support their family. These identified children come to the LUC centre every day between the hours of 7:00am and 7:00pm, where they are provided breakfast, and lunch, and have the opportunity to attend educational enrichment classes. 

The project aims to provide a safe environment where the children can learn, play, be creative, challenge themselves, have fun and grow into happy, healthy young adults. In addition, LUC hopes to give them the skills and opportunities they need to become confident about and prepared for the future whilst having the tools to make educated decisions. Here, the volunteers assisted in the daily tasks of the staff members at LUC: cooking, teaching, playing, cleaning, painting, dancing and so on.

Cambodia – Elephant Valley Project (EVP)

Here I was working alongside local mahouts (elephant keepers) the volunteers were taking care at Elephant Valley Project for the rescued elephants, some of which have been abused or cruelly maimed by landmines. They spent many, magical sun-drenched hours escorting the elephants on its ambling adventures as it roamed free through jungle and grasslands, washing troubles away in the river and simply observing the largest mammal on Earth at incredible close-quarters in the wildest reaches of South East Asia.

Link between volunteering and tourism

During the weekends and between the phases of their volunteer trip, the volunteers could go on day trips or overnight trips to touristic places in the areas where they stayed. Sometimes, there were even ‘Adventurous Weeks’, ‘Island Trips’ or ‘Rutas del Sol’ included, for example. For the volunteers, the volunteer program was a way to stay longer in the country and to get a more in-depth immersion into the local culture, as compared to a usually shorter roundtrip or backpacking trip through Latin America or Southeast Asia. Moreover, it was a way for the them to make their travel not only beneficial to themselves, but also to the local communities they visited along the way.

My experience with the volunteer projects

When I started as a group leader in Ecuador, I had no experience in volunteering abroad. I was enthusiast and I really enjoyed the work. Each project had its own unique character and contribution to sustainable development. The projects seemed to be carefully selected by the local NGO which had a good reputation since many years in this sector. Of course, the volunteers were very young and not always as interested or motivated in the volunteer work itself, but with extra effort from our team we were able to lead them through the various phases of their program: despite them feeling homesick, sick, unmotivated or more interested in exploring the country or having a good party. 

When I later moved to Cambodia, I started to look different at things. The projects did not seem to be that well selected, I had the impression that the volunteer program was operated by a business rather than a community-based organization because the owner was a rich business man with many connections in the country. The owner let me stay in his boutique hotel for the whole Summer, where I was treated as a princess, which did not feel right to me. I felt that the volunteer business was for him part of a philanthropic effort while still making money out of it. Think of the Gates Foundation… There’s no such thing as a free gift. I started to learn slowly but steadily what volunteer tourism was about. The children in the orphanages seemed to be coming and going to the center whenever they wanted. I had to hand over hundreds of dollars to the school and orphanage directors without ever needing to ask what was happening with this money. The wife of my boss gave a television as her own birthday present to the school. There were no requirements for volunteers regarding minimum stay or teaching experience when going to teach in schools. The schools did not follow any learning plans (and neither did we offer to implement this) so the volunteers kept repeating the same basic stuff, and so on. 

I think I started to understand what was really going on (and what was really going wrong) when we were working on the water pump wells in Cambodia. While driving through the villages, I could see that many existing wells were broken or not operative. We drove further until we reached a village where there were no wells built yet. The plan was, according to my boss, to provide all villages with wells until everyone had water. It sounded great, but when I asked why we did not go to fix the broken ones or teach the village people how to use them better or how to repair them their selves, he said that was not in his business interest. Moreover, volunteers wanted to see instant result and he felt pressure to keep them happy with what they were doing. They needed to feel like they were making a difference. Here is when I realized that volunteer tourism is really a business which is not sustainable, and still mostly oriented towards the creation of profit for the volunteers and the organizers of it, rather than for the orphans, school children or village people.

Volunteer tourism is not a sustainable business.

– Julie Rausenberger

I decided not to continue my position after that contract (even though they offered to extend it) and I returned back to Belgium to start my Masters’ degree in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leuven, where I wanted to research intimacy and the concept of gift-giving within the context of volunteer tourism, this time in Cuba. I never regret this decision to quit my job in the volunteer tourism industry because the volunteer program in Cambodia has been operating the same way it was since 2014, despite my constructive critique towards the company to be more careful in the selection of volunteer projects and their long-term implementation. 

My experience with the volunteers 

I worked with volunteer tourists from the United Kingdom who were mostly between 18-22 years old and who were currently on a gap year before starting their higher studies at the university. Most of them were dividing their year off between a few months of student work in the United Kingdom and traveling abroad to explore the world. The volunteers did the latter rather in organized and controlled ways because of different reasons: they felt too insecure to travel to far-away continents on their own, or were too unexperienced to go on a backpacking adventure on their own, or they did not have a travel mate, or they were not allowed by their parents to travel alone, or they did not know where to start, or they wanted to contribute to the world while traveling and volunteering, or they wanted to have a unique travel experience, or they were looking for a way to stay longer in one country without ‘just traveling’. They also gave the impression that they wanted to make a difference somehow this way, and that they were looking to ‘find their selves’ while seeking personal development in this year off. 

Some volunteers were even sent by their parents because their parents were convinced that this program abroad would broaden their horizon and would prepare themselves better for the ‘real world’. I had the impression that, in this case, the parents found their kids spoilt and wanted them to get out of their comfort zone by traveling in a basic but still organized and safe way (because of the guidance, group leader presence, follow up, weekly reports to parents, …). Also, the volunteer programs were very expensive and therefore obviously targeted towards a specific target group of richer families who sent their children on ‘an adventure of a lifetime’ in the hope that their children would learn not to take things for granted. Sometimes this led to paradoxical situations: the volunteers wanted to go back to basics and experience the ‘real Ecuador or Cambodia’ but in the same time they complained when their room was not ‘good enough’ or when they did not get cereals for breakfast or milk in their tea (knowing that milk and cereals are expensive in Cambodia).  

At times I was frustrated because the volunteers did not show as much interest and motivation in the volunteer work as I hoped for.

– Julie Rausenberger

A reason for this could be that they were sent by their parents, but also that they expected to see faster results. It was not motivational for them to be working on digging holes for water pipe lines in Chilcapamba, for example, for weeks. Rather, they seemed to be satisfied when they could see instant results such as when they were building a water well pump in Siem Reap: this only took a few days to be finished per well. I also noticed that they enjoyed it more to be surrounded by children or to be involved in social work in orphanages or schools. The fact that they never spoke the local language (Spanish or Khmer) withheld them from engaging more in-depth with the local community members they were working with, so the contact was again very limited and not reaching the level they had hoped for. With children, this seemed less problematic because playing did not need that much conversation. Interestingly, most of the volunteers did not make efforts before or while traveling in-country to learn the local language. This showed for me that they were only partially looking for a real engagement with the communities.

Last but not least, it speaks for itself that a large part of the trip was about fun, parties, adventures, activities and other things that are related to tourism for young travellers. The touristic aspect of the trip was very important to the volunteers, despite us – as organizers – trying constantly to put the voluntary work to the foreground. 

5. Which impacts did the work in these projects have to your personal life and to the other participants?

Impact on my personal life

At the very personal level, I think that the volunteering pushed me into the direction of my continued university studies in Social and Cultural Anthropology (after having studied Tourism and Leisure Management). I remember I met a French anthropologist, Richard Couedel, in the jungle in Ecuador. He was studying the community we were working with and eventually published a book “Yo me acuerdo, biografía de un líder Tsa’chila”about it a few years later. I was very inspired by his research and life in the community. A colleague of mine in Quito was also an anthropologist, so again, I felt that anthropology was a useful discipline to study if I wanted to continue a career in the non-profit sector. Most of all…

I realized after many personal experiences in the volunteer industry abroad, I could make a more meaningful difference by writing about volunteer tourism and researching the phenomenon than to do the actual volunteer work.

Julie Rausenberger

I also met very interesting people along the way while I worked within these organizations. For example, one of the volunteer coordinators in the UK became a friend and she now runs her own travel business in Tanzania and she has invited me to come over. Another colleague from Canada who worked in Ecuador with me is now living in New Zealand and working with another NGO, for example. It is these connections with other persons that I really value and that really had an impact on my life because they inspire me and make me believe that there are other life routes than a village life and a 9-to-5 job in Belgium.

Impact on the volunteers’ life

It is of course difficult to tell what the impacts of these volunteer programs were on the life of the volunteers because I did not keep in touch with all of them and I cannot know how they feel about it. However, from what I have seen, there are very varied scenarios: some people really opened up, I could see them becoming more confident, more assertive, more culturally aware and so on. Others could not deal with the out-of-the-comfort level of the volunteer programs. Some became very homesick or even wanted to go home (one volunteer really left home early despite us trying to cheer him up repeatedly). 

Others again saw this volunteer experience as the starting point and preparation for their independent travels. They went to travel afterwards on their own in Latin America of Southeast Asia. For some, this continuation of later travels – post-volunteering with our organization – turned out a great adventure, but for some it was a complete disaster: they were shocked how much they suddenly needed to plan and organize their selves without having the support and translation of our organization. 

On the long term, I kept in touch with some of the volunteers whom I saw growing from adolescents to young adults with a university degree and a full-time job nowadays. I do not have the impression that they became ambassadors for the volunteer work they did, or that they repeated a volunteer program ever again (not even in another country). They also did not become ‘world travellers’ or ‘frequent backpackers’, in most cases. Rather, I see them going back to a more traditional form of tourism (like package holidays or city trips within Europe) when I see and hear about their recent holidays on social media. 

One thing is for sure to me…

Volunteer programs have more impact on the personal development of the volunteers itself than that their personal effort has an impact on the volunteer projects

– Julie Rausenberger

6. What was the greatest experience during this time?

Without a doubt, I have the best memories from my time working as a volunteer group leader in Ecuador. Maybe because it was the first volunteer program I worked on, but I think it has to do with the professionalism of the NGO I worked for. The projects were very well selected and I was also very lucky to have a nice group of volunteers to lead. The most beautiful memory I have is from the Tsachila community in Ecuador because this was for me the most authentic experience. I slept in a wooden bungalow without electricity supply, there was only a natural toilet, and the shower was in the river in a lush forest. We ate bananas with fresh river fish in the morning and had no fridge. There was not even a phone signal and there was only one truck per day going to the nearest village one hour further from where I lived. The volunteer work was rewarding because we were planting small tree in bags to plant new forests to beat the deforestation in the area by American oil companies. I just knew how important this was for the local community and they were never able to build all of these trees ever again in this amount of time on top of their normal daily work. It was very humid and tough at times to work here, but because of the remote location and isolation of the community, we grew more closely together to the locals, even without knowing their language: Tsafiki.

I personally grew closer to the head of the community, who spoke Spanish, and for whom I translated everything to English to the volunteers. He was a shaman with a lot of natural wisdom who taught me to get closer connected to nature. He taught me about his spiritual life and the magic effects of ayahuasca (a traditional drink containing natural ingredients from the Amazon that causes shamans or healers to reach the expansion of their consciousness). For me, these are experiences and interactions that I will never forget. Also, the Yanapuma NGO worked together with him for many years in the battle against capitalism and the deforestation in the area, and they used the money for the conversation of this community. I really felt that the work we did, combined with the financial contribution of the volunteers, made a difference in their lives. 

7. How do you finance your trips?

I always had a both fortunate and unfortunate situation when I was a student: because I came from a rather disadvantaged family background, I managed to get scholarships more easily to finance my studies as well as my studies abroad. I got a scholarship for my internship in Ecuador and I was lucky that the NGO covered my daily expenses: Yanapuma provided food, accommodation, program related travel, and certain activities (such as white water rafting and mountain biking) while I was working as a group leader with my group. When the group was traveling to the Galapagos Islands, I had the option to stay on the mainland or to go with the group but then I had to pay my flight myself, but I still got accommodation and a few weeks off there. 

When I went to Cambodia, the company paid my flights and travel expenses, as well as housing and food. My personal expenses I covered with some saving money, which I gathered together from during student work in Belgium as a travel agent, social media manager, sales assistant, and many other student jobs that I combined with my studies. My parents have never supported my travels financially, but I always managed to budget my trips carefully. Gradually, I also became an expert in negotiating deals in destinations with local suppliers: for example, in Ecuador I would always take my volunteers to restaurants where I got good deals so that I could get something for free, or when I organized excursions for the groups in in Ecuador during their free time, I negotiated that I could join for free as their group leader. This way, I did not need much more additional pocket money to travel either.

8. In your opinion what is the best way to organise a volunteer trip?

I think the best way is to start with volunteering at home and to think about which values you are willing to represent and defend even before and after the volunteer trip.

– Julie Rausenberger

Especially now that we are living in a digital era, we can no longer find excuses to defend the values we stand for, whether these are civil rights in Ecuador or equal access to water in Cambodia. There are many social and political platforms where you can share your experiences, knowledge, where you can start campaigns, sign petitions, or you can become a member of an NGO in your country which defends your values. 

If you are then still feeling the need to go volunteering abroad, instead of empowering local communities in their own country, to defend their rights and develop their lands, then you should do a lot of research before you decide what you will do and where you will do and with whom you will do it. Nowadays, the internet is full of articles and papers about the pro’s and con’s regarding volunteer tourism. One good source I would recommend is: ‘Learning Service: The Essential Guide to Volunteering Abroad’, a book in which I contributed my experiences (anonymously) as well. On the website www.leaningservice.info you can find many useful tips and information on how to do ‘doing good’ well.

On a personal note: I found out about Learning Service through Daniela Papi. She was also working many years in the volunteer industry in Phnom Penh in Cambodia for PEPY Tours. When I first saw her TedX Talk on YoutubeI was mesmerized. In my opinion, she hit the nail on the haid. I started following her work and that’s how I started to understand better how to organize a volunteer trip.

Another good checklist on ethical volunteering trips abroad can be find on HostelWorld

9. What is your personal view on Volunteer Tourism? Do you have anything to criticize about that concept? (if yes, why and what?)

This is a very complex question to answer because I can give many arguments both pro and contra the phenomenon. As already mentioned, nowadays I support more the perspective of Service Learning, as developed on the website www.learningservice.info.

As mentioned before, I believe that people should not engage in volunteer tourism if they are not willing to OR engage in volunteering at home OR engage in defending the project at a long-term basis as ‘an ambassador for the good cause’ they are supporting during the trip. First of all, if you are willing to volunteer, there are plenty opportunities at home. If you are merely willing to do this because you can travel abroad, then maybe the intention is more self-centred / opportunistic than altruistic. I believe that the idea of volunteer tourism should still be to support local communities / projects / … primarily, your personal development should come second. So, basically, my greatest criticism would be that volunteer tourists tend to think more about how it will turn out for them personally, then for the ‘Other’ and this is a treat to the phenomenon. This is in line with critiques of volunteer tourists using their volunteer trip as an argument on their CV to show that they gained experiences in intercultural awareness etcetera. 

Also, I mentioned before that organizers of volunteer tourism should be engaging more with long-term goals and ways of working to improve the sustainability of projects and benefits for local communities. Think about the water pump wells in Cambodia example I gave. The problem that summarizes this tendency of ignorance is expertise. Both the organisations as the volunteers lack the expertise to be involved with volunteer tourism: the volunteers do not have the skills to be teaching English, for example, and the organizations do not have the means, tools or knowledge to be creating a sustainable project plan. 

What happens when there is a lack of awareness of expertise, is that volunteer tourism can do more harm than good.

– Julie Rausenberger

It is not good for children to get another teacher from another country every two weeks. The dynamic of volunteer tourism can also undermine local workers, who are put aside when a volunteer comes to take over the job.  

10.Meanwhile the combination of travel and voluntary work is developing into a profitable business. What do you think about tour operators that offer Volunteer Tourism? Is helping in this concept helpful for the locals?

First of all, we must recognise the difference between non-governmental organizations (NGO’s) offering volunteer programs and tour operators (commercial enterprises). 

To be honest, I think that tour operators are undoubtedly monetizing volunteerism into an industry. They are charging a lot of money for these programs, and most money goes into the organizational aspects of the volunteers’ trip as well as the support given to the volunteers. Many staff members are involved in a volunteer program: imagine that for my groups there was a travel agent involved in the UK, a webmaster, a marketing director, a volunteer coordinator, a group leader (or two in case there is a local group leader needed for translation or in case the groups are large) and a reservation agent for operational queries, just to name a few. The donations given to the projects are indeed also included in the expensive program prices, but I did not have the impression that the company cared about what is actually done with the money. For example, I remember that I had to donate money to an orphanage director who had the latest new smartphone and a nice motor cycle, and that I was promptly wondering whether it might have been that he bought those with the donation money (because we never got to see what he actually did with the donations). Also, in order to maintain a long-term collaboration with local projects, the projects need to remain ‘poor’ in order to be attractive in the ‘needy’ discourse that volunteer tourism organizations like to present to the tourists. This is such a pity. I think this is also the case with The Leap Gap Years Overseas, a company specializing in volunteer programs abroad for UK based travellers. 

In the case of NGOs, I think that the situation in much different. In Ecuador, for example, I worked with Yanapuma Foundation. This NGO has financial challenges to survive: they need to commercialize their projects through collaborations with volunteer companies such as The Leap Gap Years Overseas in order to earn an income to invest in their community project. They lack financial support by governments and depend on donations from volunteers. The money that they earn by collaborating with volunteer programs goes partially into the operational costs (such as housing, transport and staff salaries), but also to invest in the development of their projects. To give you an example, developing a website is very costly for an NGO and to finance this, they can also use the money they earn by their collaborations with tourists. You can also find the yearly reviews of NGOs online, or request them by email, which usually reflects their transparency. 

For the ‘locals’ involved in volunteer tourism, this is a business like another: whether you are selling a cooking workshop or a toilet construction project, it is basically the same. I had the impression that the locals saw it as a job and that they were nothing like ‘the needy’ persons that are often depicted in advertisements for volunteer tourism. They gave me the impression of participating in the game of tourism: you look authentic, poor, smile, be thankful, speak a little bit, show them a bit of what traditional skill you can, and in return they get paid for this. Maybe it is not always this straight forward: sometimes the organizers will come ‘for free’ and are ‘invited’ by local communities, but they are well aware that such a collaboration will help them to construct a new house or that they will leave them with a donation at the end, for example. In this regard, I am still very frustrated with the power dynamics going on in the First World Giver – Third World Receiver discourse that is deeply entangled in the tourism industry. I tried to write about this in my Masters’ thesis as well.

In summary, I think there is always an interest involved, whether financial or not, for all of the parties involved, and it is therefore much less about the actual help that local communities or projects need than about economic or personal development for the parties involved. 

If volunteer tourism organisations and volunteer tourists really wanted to help local communities, they would pass on their knowledge and skills to the local communities involved. 

– Julie Rausenberger

However, this does usually not happen because it would translate soon into a death end of the business, which it unfortunately remains. I questioned once too: why do we not invest the money that we spend on our volunteer program travels ourselves fully into a donation, if we would really want to help financially? Ah, because maybe the volunteer wants to travel more than he wants to support?!

11.Is a catalogue of requirements for tour operators or anyone who offers Volunteer Tourism in that business appropriate (as an entrance examination)?

The last decade there has been an increasing attention paid by NGOs and in academia to the volunteer tourism industry. Many articles are published in scientific journals and online to raise awareness about the issues with volunteer tourism. Simultaneously, the volunteer tourism industry is booming and Generation Y, or the Millenials, keep showing a significant interest in traveling ‘for a good cause’. 

Many organizations have been publishing guidelines and tips about ‘how to volunteer abroad ethically’ and ‘how to avoid the voluntourism gap’. Tour operators such as Gadventures nowadays promote such guidelines on their own websites by collaborating with Planeterra, for example. Together with the International Ecotourism Society (TIES), Planeterra (a leading non-profit organisation dedicated to sustainable community development and environmental conversation through travel), has set up a set of criteria to help volunteer tourism organisers to offer, plan and manage their volunteer programs. 

A catalogue of requirements exists but there is no overarching international organization that is controlling their operations. There are organizations who try it, such as Fair Trade Tourism in Africa and beyond, but I think there is a need for more attention to be paid by the phenomenon ‘volunteer tourism’ at a global scale by the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)The Code on Responsible Travel launched in 2017 was a good start. Hopefully it is the beginning of a continued trend.

12.Critics are particularly concerned that unskilled volunteers take a part in the children lives, especially short-time stays are under strong critique which do more harm than good. Do you agree?

Yes, as mentioned above, I believe that it is irresponsible to engage as a volunteer tourist for a short period of time in teaching English to children in schools or to engage in social work more generally. Orphanage tourism should be banned overall, regardless of volunteer activities being short term or long term because it is focusing too much on compassion and guilt. This again something that I tried to explain in my thesis ‘Why Don’t You Give Me Some Love?!’ in Section 4.3.4 on ‘Help, Consciousness or Guilt?’ (page 84).  

Orphanage tourism should be banned worldwide because it focuses on discourses of compassion and guilt.

– Julie Rausenberger

When I was working with orphans in Cambodia, I heard rumours that the children were bought from their own families to go and live in an orphanage. For their families this initially seemed an excellent opportunity: they got money which they otherwise never be able to earn and they were promised that their child would be educated, well fed and taken care of. However, the child was taken away from its family which could sometimes lead to post-traumatic stress disorder and detachment. Moreover, when the child got ill or misbehaved in front of tourists, orphanages tend to send back the child to its family. The family then ends up dealing with the problem and loses the money. These are situations that I believe often happen. The offer is, in most cases, too good to be true.

13.Local people get degraded to an aid recipient, volunteers presented as social workers or even heroes. The communication doesn’t seem to meet at eye level. How would it be possible to change the point of view in their heads?

*This question is hard to answer as it is not entirely clear to me. Volunteers are presented by who as social workers? Which communication are you referring to? Whose communication are you referring to when mentioning ‘the communication’? Whose heads are you referring to?* 

I assume that you are trying to ask how I suggest to change the mentality of volunteer tourists when it comes to their – what we call in academia – ‘White Savior Complex’. It refers to white people helping non-white people, which can be perceived as self-interested and which is typical to our times. I think that the book ‘The White Man’s Burden’by Rudyard Kipling is explaining very well what is going on, still today.

Communication of volunteer organisations is a matter of marketing, not anthropology, unfortunately. There is a lack of cultural relativism in volunteer tourism discourses as adapted by volunteer companies.The often-used expressions such as ‘Discover the real Africa’, ‘Help poor people now’, ‘give back to society’ and ‘go local’, are good examples of typical expressions that can be problematized from an anthropological perspective. Not enough attention is given to the agency – the capacity of persons to independently act and make their own decisions or choices – in the press or in marketing of such companies because they want to enforce the hegemonic discourse of need. In Ecuador, for example, I have personally witnessed that the local communities were acting as very powerful examples of sustainable development to other communities in their society. They were seen as creative entrepreneurs with an open-minded approach to development because they were having cross-cultural relationships with volunteers around the globe, learning foreign languages and because they were actively engaging in political struggles to defend their lands. 

Marketeers in the volunteer tourism industry still reinforce the hegemonic discourse of need in development cooperation.

Julie Rausenberger

Even more, sometimes – I would dare to say – communities were actively trying to ‘play’ the ‘impoverished’ role because it was in their economic advantage. This was especially the case in Cuba, where I have been participating in a volunteer brigade to express solidarity with the Cuban Revolution in 2016. We often neglect the agency of the communities we work with because we are made believe that they need our help. The first steps to change this would probably be education, ethically responsible marketing and communication and no misleading advertisement and press. 

14.Do you think a volunteer trip has more good impact on the local society than bad?

Like any other type of tourism, volunteer tourism has a strong effect on the development of a local society, village or community.There are always positive and negative consequences involved in this, depending on the parties involved and the perspective you have. Economically, volunteer tourism will be beneficial for those parties involved that work in the industry. For others, it might translate in a loss of jobs: think about English teachers in Thailand, for example. At the socio-cultural level, I do not believe that volunteer tourism is good: it reinforces unequal power relations in the world through a First World giver and Third World receiver discourse and it reinforces tourism as neo-colonialism through its indirect political control over developing countries. 

15.How can you improve Volunteer Tourism in regard to the critical points that it might has?

I often feel ashamed these days when I look back to my volunteer tourism activities and because I actively promoted the industry myself. I feel that I have been part of the neo-imperialistic machine that characterizes the capitalistic rather than altruistic trend in volunteer tourism. However, there is no way back and I cannot erase my past experiences. I can only turn my negative experiences into something positive: I have therefore transformed my attitude towards one of service learning (and this interview is part of this transformative attitude). 

I feel that I have been part of the neo-imperialistic machine that characterizes the capitalistic rather than altruistic trend in volunteer tourism.

– Julie Rausenberger

I learned to accept my ‘mistakes’ in the volunteer industry abroad by turning it into something positive these days back at home: because of my own experiences I also have the power to share why volunteer tourism is bad and now I try to encourage people to think twice before they book their volunteer trip, rather than to support them to ‘do more harm than good’. I believe that if all ex volunteer tourists who feel the same can unite and spread this message of a sustainable tourism and inspire other to engage in positive volunteer practices at home and abroad.

Interview conducted by Julia Rommel.

Interviewee: Julie Rausenberger

Backpacking for Beginners – The Perfect 1 Month Itinerary in India

Make the Most out of Your Time in India!

India is a massive country and it is impossible to see it all in one trip. Actually, many travelers will tell you that you will need at least a half year for a decent cultural immersion, but hey… who the hell has a 6 months holiday? Most people work, study or have a life (apart from discovering the world) and can only afford (in terms of money and time) to get a 1-month holiday. The same goes for me.

I only had 1 month to travel in India, and I wanted to see it all. If you want to make the most out of your 4 weeks in India, continue reading this blog to discover the perfect itinerary for first-time visitors who want to backpack through this massive and incredible country. Tested and approved! 😉

India is the most colorful country I’ve ever visited, and I simply LOVE it for that reason!
Continue reading

The Morning After Cambodia

What happens the morning after? Will we get closer? Or will I just feel like I just made a big mistake? The “morning after” usually refers to what happens after two people have sex. And it usually depends on what happens the night before. In my case, the morning after refers to Cambodia, and to what happened a few months ago. I do not mean that I had sex with the country (of course not), but I do refer to the manner in which I was emotionally overwhelmed, because it was at least as ‘deep’. 😉

Sihanoukville 400

In love with Cambodia @ Koh Rong Samloem

I mean, if you are in love with a country and you have thought about the decision to volunteer, your entire experience can be something turning out dramatically different than your initial expectations if the country – or other (f)actors – do not seem to be on the same line as you are. Volunteering won’t automatically bring you closer, you might probably feel better by doing it initially but if you and the country do not seem to find a solution for the projects you’re working on, you might be asking yourself questions:

  • Why do I (still) want to volunteer?
  • What does voluntourism mean to me?
  • Does voluntourism fit with my values?
  • Is this a short-term thing or do I see this having a long-term benefit?
  • And if we have a relationship, what does connect us?

I never expected myself to raise these questions in my mind, but after working in the volunteer industry in Cambodia, I did ask myself many deep questions about volunteering and tourism (so called ‘voluntourism’).

  • What kinds of projects work?
  • Who will benefit from our projects: the locals, the industry or the volunteer?
  • What will we do if it fails?

Tonle Sap & Basket Weaving 233

What if voluntourism was like a fake ‘snake’ / sneaky friend?

“Don’t fear the enemy that attacks you but the fake friend that hugs you.”

When I was working in Cambodia this summer, the first weeks I was doing my job great and I traveled around with the volunteers. Only by the time we were finishing our volunteer projects, I started to raise these questions. Some things just weren’t right. Maybe that’s the reason why I stopped blogging? Because I was confused?

I mean… If you are building toilets without offering maintenance or technical support, what does the family then do when the toilet is broken?

I mean… If you are building water pumping wells and you don’t supply the water filters, how can those people then give water to their children?

I mean… If you are teaching English to a class of children, but you only stay for two weeks, how can you get to teach them something worthy?

I mean… If you are going to play with orphans in a so-called orphanage, does it really make these children better if you leave again after two weeks? 

Cambodia Leap 228

Volunteering in Sihanoukville (Cambodia), Summer 2014

These are only a couple of questions that raised in my mind, after working as a volunteer group leader in Cambodia… And of course, I have seen many beautiful things too and the volunteering did contribute to many factors too. I am only disappointed that I feel like voluntourism does seem to have more positive impacts on the personal development of the lives of my volunteers, than it does on the country. That is why I talk about a “morning after” effect.

In the mean time, months have passed by that I am back from Cambodia, but I can’t get this questions out of my mind. And as I started my Masters in Anthropology in September, I found that this issue is the appropriate topic for me to write my thesis about. Therefor, I am now researching a lot about Voluntourism and its impacts. And I have found surprisingly much information and articles about it. So much that I am even stuck in finding my own research question to solve in my thesis. 🙂 So if you can help me, comment bellow and help me finding my thesis topic!

No, the real reason why I want to share my feelings about voluntourism in this blogpost, is not about willing to stop the explosion of voluntourism. I still do have a lot of respect for all the volunteers in the world that want to spend time hoping to help a country and its people forward. I believe that they all have the right intentions, but that the problem of voluntourism is somewhere in a layer underneath: somewhere between the intermediaries and the local businesses… And I am afraid I am not powerful (and even not brave) enough to fix that fundamental issue.

to hell with good intentions

What I do hope to send out as a message via this blog post is to be aware that you might be going to hell with good intentions. One of the problems is that “There has always been a nagging inadequacy around the assertion that one cannot sell poverty, but one can sell paradise. Today the tourism industry does sell poverty.” (quote from my Professor Noel Salazar from Tourist Behaviour: A Psychological Perspective)

I am afraid that I cannot give you that much answers yet, but what I can advise you is to be careful when you decide to go abroad volunteering. You can find tips and tricks on http://learningservice.info/ , created by the ‘rethinkers of volunteer travel’. Because I am convinced that we all want to make the most out of volunteering and travels, but we have to do it the right way. And if we – volunteers – are aware of the critical issues in voluntourism, we are one step closer to rethinking and re-creating what used to be a noble random act of kindness.

service-learning

And don’t worry, I don’t have the intentions to stop volunteering. I won’t stop before I have the feeling that something has changed, partially through my efforts. Because you have never really lived until you have done something for someone who can never repay you. ❤ Share the message if you agree that volunteer travel needs to change. Awareness is the greatest agent for change! ❤

Lots of love

x Julie x

My Galápagos Dream Journey – 7: San Cristobal

7: SAN CRISTOBAL

After taking a 2 hour boat ride from Isabela to Santa Cruz, and another one from Santa Cruz to San Cristobal, I had finally arrived back at the island where my Leap group was volunteering.

Islas de Galapagos san cristobal

View from Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, capital of Galapagos

During my stopover in Santa Cruz, I had the best fruit bowl with granola for breakfast ever, and visited the Charles Darwin Research Center, as it is not so far walking from the peer and it is a must-see in the islands, I was told. However, it did not really impress me a lot. After the death of Lonesome George, I do not think that there is that much more to see in the station. Or at least not things you can’t see anywhere else on the islands, such as iguanas and tortoises.

Islas de Galapagos tortoise

Tortoises in Charles Darwin Research Center, Santa Cruz

So I walked back quite quickly, went to the internetcafe to do some work for school, had a salad for lunch (yes, a healthy day) and bought some last souvenirs on the avenue. Then it was time to board the next ferry, which would bring me in another two hours to San Cristobal.

I did not have a reservation or a fixed plan, but I was not planning to return to Hacienda Tranquila because I wanted my two last nights to be spent as a holiday. So when I arrived at Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, I went to a hostel called Leon Dormido and asked if they had a room. They tried to sell it for $30 a night, but I got it down to $20, convincing them that I did not have more budget. I got a very nice room with airconditioning and hot water, and I had to walk 2 steps to be on the main street. And there was WiFi, even in the room. Perfect!

After putting my laundry in the shop, I met my group by coincidence in town. We had a drink together and decided to meet for dinner in a restaurant. It was really nice to spend that evening together with them again and I enjoyed a chicken burger. We watched the sea lions playing on the beach at night and then we headed back seperately to our accommodations.

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Sea lion in San Cristobal

Thursday 8th of May it was my last full day on the islands, and I had a free day to do whatever I felt like doing. I slept later then my usual 6 o`clock, had a good breakfast and was planning to go searching for `Fundacion Nueva Era` as Yanapuma was interested in a collaboration with them. It felt like a great coincidence, because while I was eating breakfast on a terrace, some poster crossed my eye and that was it! Right there was the foundation. So I went inside, explained myself and 5 minutes later I had an appointment with the boss for the next morning. Great because that ment work for today was done…

I went for a walk in town, bought some souvenir, had a freshly squeezed juice and did some reflection on my time in the Galapagos. It had definetely been a great journey so far. And to give myself some last sun rays before heading back to Quito, I headed to the beach. I walked via the coast to Playa Mann, which was surprisingly relaxed. There was a beach bar, again some sea lions and some trees to look for shadow when the sun is too hot.

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Beach bar at Playa Mann, San Cristobal

I also visited the opposite Interpretaton Center of San Cristobal, which was the most interesting museum of the Galapagos Islands, to my opinion. After traveling a lot, I felt like all the pieces fell together and I got answers to questions I did not think about. It was free entrance and I have learned a lot of things about the history of the island and the income generation of tourism for example.

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The most interesting information of all… – Interpretation Center

After the cultural visit I went back to the beach and watched sunset. Enjoying to the fullest my very last moments here. I went to the hostel for a shower, and had something small for dinner. As the Galapagos came to an end, it means that another Phase with my Leap volunteers was coming soon. Tomorrow I would meet them at the airport to fly back to Quito and start the Adventure Week. I was definetely nervous for that, but come on up… Break a leg!

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Last Sunset on San Cristobal

Well, that was it. The end of my Galapagos Dream Journey. I had spend 3 weeks on the islands, felt like the luckiest girl on earth for having this amazing opportunity to visit the islands on a budget and was absolutely sure about never ever ever forgetting this in my life. I had seen the most amazing animals on earth, met great people, found new volunteer projects and did some volunteer work myself as well, was more tanned then ever before, spend too much money but oh so well spend so I could not care, I felt great because life was good and with loads of energy I was heading back to Ecuador`s mainland, ready to give the best of myself for another 4 weeks with The Leap.

Bless you all!

From Julie with Love

Let’s take THE LEAP!

The time has finally come… The Leapers (group of volunteers from the company The Leap) have arrived… This means that from now on I am officially Group Leader for 11 youngsters, including 7 boys and 4 girls from the United Kingdom. After one month of hard work, explorations, reservations and organisation, I am happy to present my program for the next 10 weeks with this group.

However, this also means that I will not be able to write so much as before anymore, because there will be not always access to the internet in the volunteer projects. Therefore, I apologize and promise to do my best to write and post something every once in a while…

the leapWhat is THE LEAP?

Volunteering with The Leap is unique because every Volunteer Leap combines a unique mix of projects – so they will help with conservation, community and eco-tourism development over the course of 10 weeks overseas. Even better these projects are located in different places around the country of choice, with the Leap team moving around every few weeks. The result is a massively diverse, enjoyable mix of challenges, cultures and environments.

What is THE LEAP program in Ecuador?

ECUADOR: Jungle + Galapagos + Adventure Week + Andes

  • Jungle (Tsachila): 3 April – 18 April
  • Galapagos (San Cristobal): 20 April – 9 May
  • Adventure Week (Quilotoa, Baños, Riobamba): 10 May – 16 May
  • Andes (Chilcapamba, Mindo): 18 May – 2 June
  • Ruta del Sol (Guayaquil, Montañita): 4 June – 7 June

Between these dates, my home base will stay Quito, where I will return with the group to wash clothes, buy stuff and give orientations about the different destinations and volunteer projects. As you could see, I’ve already visited and posted about 2 of the voluntuur  projects that we are going to (Tsachila and Chilcapamba). I will also go with the group to a volunteer project in the Galapagos Islands, where I will have some time off of being Group Leader to discover the islands on my own. This is without a doubt one of my biggest dreams coming true. Thank God for all this wonderful opportunities and let’s pray that everything is going well with my Leapers throughout the 10 weeks! We are going to work hard and travel harder! 😛

As you can see, this group leading will take almost all of my time in Ecuador. And when this program is done and the group members travel further or back to the UK, I will be finishing lots of administration in the office of Yanapuma (the operating agent for The Leap in Ecuador). Then I only have a few days left until I fly back to Belgium on the 19th of June. Time will fly, as you might be able to imagine, and before you know, I’m reunited with my love, my friends, my family and my cats. ❤

If you’re interested, you can check out the program on the website: http://www.theleap.co.uk/volunteering-in-ecuador.html

do one thing that scares you

And let’s especially remember…

“Life begins at the end of your comfort zone!”

Let’s take THE LEAP! I am ready to take off…

Julie

THE BIG TRIP – Day 10: Porto & Braga (FINAL)

TRAVELOGUE – Blogpost 13: Day 10 (06/4/13) – Porto & Braga ( FINAL POST)

It was the last time we got up so early again with the five of us, because … Oh yes, it was the last, intensive day of our trip! We were exhausted, but somehow more ready than ever to make this last day the best!

Het was de allerlaatste keer dat we zo vroeg weer opstonden met zijn vijven, want… Jawel hoor, het was dan ook de laatste, intensieve dag van onze trip! We waren uitgeput, maar hoe dan ook meer dan ooit klaar om er voor een laatste keer een lap op te geven!

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Our morning program was already busy planned with a visit to “the other side of Porto”. With this we mean the other side of the river, where all the port breweries (read: tasting houses) are located. But as early as that we could not drink of course, and certainly not on an empty stomach … So we decided to go parking the car first on “the other side”, eat breakfast somewhere over there (much cheaper than in the city itself, we thought) and then we could walk across the bridge to Porto and take  some nice pictures of the view.

Ons ochtendprogramma was al druk gepland met een bezoek aan “de andere kant van Porto”. Hiermee bedoelden we de andere kant van de rivier, waar alle portobrouwerijen (lees: proeverijen) gevestigd zijn. Maar zo vroeg konden we natuurlijk nog niet drinken, en al zeker niet op een nuchtere maag… Dus besloten we om eerst de auto te gaan parkeren aan “de andere kant”, daar ergens te ontbijten (ook veel goedkoper dan in de stad zelf, dachten we) en vervolgens konden we over de brug wandelen voor wat mooie foto’s van uitzicht.

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Then it was time to do some more exploring in Porto because we actually had only seen a small part of it with the FREE CITY TOUR (you can read more about this in the previous blog post, about Fatima and Porto). And then we would again crossing the bridge, finally ending our Porto-story in style with wine tasting. Wonderful idea, we thought!

Dan was het even tijd om Porto nog wat meer te verkennen, want we hadden eigenlijk nog alleen maar het stuk gezien met de FREE CITY TOUR (meer hierover lees je in de vorige blogpost, over Fatima en Porto). En daarna zouden we opnieuw de brug oversteken, om tegen de middag dan eindelijk ons bezoek aan Porto in stijl af te sluiten bij een wijnproeverij. Heerlijk idee, leek ons dat!

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So … we started with a delicious breakfast at a local bakery in Vila Nova de Gaia, because that is how  “the other side of Porto” is called officially. It was actually not even breakfast, but one and all sweetness. I do not have to tell you that I had no problem with that​​! 😉

Dus… we startten met een heerlijk ontbijtje bij een plaatselijk bakkerij’tje in Vila Nova de Gaia, want zo heette “de andere kant van Porto” officieel. Dat was eigenlijk zelfs geen ontbijt, maar één en al zoetigheid. Ik hoef je niet te vertellen dat ik daar geen enkel probleem van maakte! 😉

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Then it was time to burn some calories and so we walked a little bit, as I said: over the bridge, and again we took some great shots of the beautiful views we had from there.

Daarna was het wel wat tijd om calorieën te verbranden en dus liepen we een eindje, zoals gezegd: over de brug, en met weer heel wat schitterende foto’s van de prachtige uitzichten die we van daaruit hadden.

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Once over the bridge, we were back in the city of Porto and we went to the cathedral. This time we wanted to climb it to have more of those beautiful views and to do some sporty  things too of course!

Eens over de brug, waren we terug in de stad Porto en trokken we naar de kathedraal. Deze wilde we beklimmen om nog méér van die mooie uitzichten te hebben, en om eens wat sportiefs te doen ook natuurlijk!

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Awesome views from the cathedral: // Prachtige uitzichten vanaf de kathedraal: 

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We also went back to that wonderful bookstore where JK Rowling got inspired to write her famous Harry Potter – books (also read more about this in the previous blog post). We planned to buy some books but in the end we just hung around for half an hour. Enjoying the atmosphere …

We gingen ook nog even terug naar die prachtige boekenwinkel waar JK Rowling haar inspiratie voor de beroemde Harry Potter – boeken opdeed (lees ook hier meer over in de vorige blogpost). We planden om wat boeken te kopen, maar uiteindelijk hingen we er gewoon een half uurtje rond. Van de sfeer genieten, zeg maar …

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We bought some post cards and souvenirs, and then it was time for the last time crossing that bridge. Bye city of Porto, Hello wine of Porto!

We kochten nog wat postkaartjes en souvenirs, en dan was het tijd om voor de laatste keer die brug over te steken. Bye city of Porto, Hello wine of Porto!

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Oh yes, we entered Vila Nova de Gaia, looking for Taylor’s. This is the most famous and the second oldest winery of Porto. It is like many other port-houses located on the other side of the Douro River, in “Vila Nova de Gaia” (officially not called Porto here).

Jawel hoor, we trokken Vila Nova de Gaia in, op zoek naar Taylor’s. Dit is het meest bekende en op één na oudste wijnhuis van Porto. Het is net als de vele andere port-huizen gevestigd in aan de overkant van de Douro-rivier, in “Vila Nova de Gaia” (dus officieel niet meer Porto).

BIG TRIP (3) 116There were a few other good wineries we could visit, like Sandeman, Osborne, Ferreira and Caves Ramos Pinto, but were advised to go to Taylor’s because they offered a good price (€ 3 for 3 glasses of wine) and they have a beautiful garden overlooking the city.

Er waren nog een paar andere goede wijnhuizen die we konden bezoeken, zoals Sandeman, Osborne, Ferreira en Caves Ramos Pinto, maar er werd ons aangeraden om naar Taylor’s te gaan: een goede prijs (€3 voor 3 wijntjes) en ze hebben er een prachtige tuin met uitzicht over de stad.

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We found it all quite a big thing there with all that fancy stuff, to which we actually were not prepared for (read: dressed for), but we still enjoyed it to the fullest.

We vonden het allemaal best een hele bedoening met al dat chique gedoe, waar we eigenlijk niet op voorzien (lees: gekleed) waren, maar genoten er toch ten volle van.

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You can see it: backpackers are really not appropriate here, but we were treated with an equally big smile, got pampered and welcomed like all other tourists!

Je ziet het: backpackers zitten hier echt niet op hun plaats, maar toch werden we met een even grote glimlach behandeld, verwend en verwelkomd als de andere toeristen!

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After our tasting 3 types of port wine, we all decided to buy some to take home, if not for ourselves, then at least for our friends and family. And so we went into the store for some shopping! (I bought two small boxes: one for my mom and her friend, and one for my grandfather, because he likes to drink Porto, I remembered).

Na onze degustatie van 3 types porto, besloten we om allemaal toch iéts mee naar huis te nemen, ware het niet voor onszelf, dan op zijn minst voor onze vrienden en familie. En dus trokken we de winkel in voor wat aankopen! (Ik kocht 2 kleine proef-kistjes: eentje voor mijn moeder en haar vriend, en eentje voor mijn grootvader, omdat die graag Porto drinkt, herinnerde ik me).

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And so it was time to go back to the car … Now the end of our trip was almost there, and we also had a lot of bottles with us, it occurred to me – and I saw – that the car quite suffered because of all that weight: we drove a Renault Clio, loaded with our backpacks, more than a week around, and the tires were relatively flat. We then decided to put extra pressure on the tires at the next gas station.

En zo was het tijd om terug naar de auto te gaan… Nu het einde van onze trip erop zat, en we ook nog eens allemaal flessen Porto hadden gekocht, bedacht ik me – en zag ik – dat de auto best wel leed onder al dat gewicht: we reden met een Renault Clio, volgeladen met onze rugzakken, al meer dan een week rond, en de banden stonden aardig plat. We besloten dan ook om bij het eerst volgende bezinestation de banden wat extra druk te geven.

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But it couldn’t be … Before we reached that nearest gas station, we drove one of our tires flat. Apparently, we had driven into a sharp piece of iron and so we had to replace the tire. And all those other bands needed the extra pressure, and of course all the same pressure… That all proved to be much easier said than done, and it took a lot longer then expected. The boys were put to the test in their male / technical abilities, while the girls (especially Ula and I) had a lot of fun making photos and videos of it. Blessing in disguise, they call it!

Maar het mocht niet zijn… Voor we dat dichtstbijzijnde benzinestation vonden, reden we één van onze banden plat. Blijkbaar waren we over een scherp stukje ijzer gereden en dus moesten we de band vervangen. Én al die andere banden wat meer druk geven, en allemaal evenveel druk natuurlijk. Dat bleek allemaal veel makkelijker gezegd dan gedaan, en duurde vooral veel langer dan voorzien. De jongens werden flink op de proef gesteld wat betreft hun mannelijke / technische capaciteiten, terwijl de meiden (vooral Ula en ik) er het plezier in zagen, en foto’s en filmpjes naar behoren namen. Geluk bij een ongeluk, noemen ze dat!

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And those guys had to work hard…

En die jongens maar zwoegen…

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So we got quite huge delayed in our day schedule, but by the late afternoon we arrived in Braga! The last destination of our great trip!

We hadden dus een aardige vertraging opgelopen in ons dagschema, maar tegen de late namiddag arriveerden we dan toch in Braga! Onze allerlaatste bestemming van onze grote trip!

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This less-known city located in the north of Portugal is known as “the Rome of Portugal”. You can find impressive architecture, including several churches and monasteries here. Braga is also very religious, there are many processions throughout the year.

Deze minder bekende stad ligt in het noorden van Portugal en staat bekend als “het Rome van Portugal”. Je vindt er indrukwekkende architectuur, waaronder verschillende kerken en kloosters. Braga is dan ook erg religieus: er worden vele processies gehouden.

BIGtrip_04-06 2756We visited – like most tourists do here – the “Bom Jesus”, which is about 5 km outside Braga and is without a doubt one of the most spectacular sanctuaries of Portugal, located on the top of a baroque staircase. The long road leading to the church has a height difference of 116 meters, which makes you have a beautiful view from the top.

Wij bezochten – zoals de meeste toeristen hier – de “Bom Jesus”, die ligt op zo’n 5 km buiten Braga en is zonder twijfel één van de meest spectaculaire heiligdommen van Portugal, gelegen aan de top van een barokke toegangstrap. De lange kruisweg die naar de kerk leidt heeft een hoogteverschil van 116 meter, waardoor je bovendien een prachtig uitzicht hebt vanaf de top.

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There is also a very beautiful and lush garden around it, so you can also enjoy the nature there.

Er is ook een erg mooie, weelderige tuin rondom de kerk, dus je kan ook nog wat van de natuur genieten.

BIGtrip_04-06 2670BIG TRIP (3) 252After doing some research I can tell you that there is a path first with chapels that symbolize Christian scenes. Then you have a terrace with “the Five Senses”: they represent sight, hearing, smell, taste and feel. And the last part on the stairs represents “the stairs of Delights” with sources and figures that symbolize faith, hope and love.

Na wat opzoekingswerk te hebben gedaan, kan ik je vertellen (even gidsen) dat er dus eerst een pad is met kapellen die christelijke taferelen zouden uitbeelden. Vervolgens heb je een terras met “de Vijf Zintuigen”: zij stellen het zicht, het gehoor, de reuk, de smaak en het gevoel uit. En als laatste stuk op de trap zie je “de trap der Deugden” met bronnen en figuren die geloof, hoop en liefde uitbeelden.

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Spicy detail: for many amorous couples, this is the dream destination to get married, or at least do a marriage proposal! 😉

Pittig detail: voor vele verliefde koppels is dit dé gedroomde plaats om te trouwen, of op zijn minst een huwelijksaanzoek te doen! 😉

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It was another wonderful visit to a another beautiful monument, and at 6 o’clock we were finally looking for our hostel for our last night, in the center of Braga.

Het was dus alweer een prachtig bezoek aan een prachtig monument, en tegen een uur of 6 gingen we dan eindelijk op zoek naar onze jeugdherberg voor onze laatste nacht, in het centrum van Braga.

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But what a disaster! Never before had  we seen such old-fashioned, smelling and military-styled youth hostel, certainly not in the year 2013! The beds were like army beds that seemed to come straight from the war years, and the sheets smelled so bad that we suspect that they were not used in months.

Viel dat even tegen! Nooit eerder hadden we zulke ouderwetse, geurende en militair aandoende jeugdherberg gezien, toch zeker niet in het jaar 2013! De bedden leken wel legerbedden die recht uit de oorlogsjaren kwamen, en de lakens roken zo verdufd dat we vermoeden dat ze in geen maanden meer gebruikt waren.

BIG TRIP (3) 337The window was opened, it was icy cold and very humid. No wonder we also found an entire mold area in the corner of the ceiling!

De raam stond open, het was er ijzig koud en erg vochtig. Geen wonder dat we in de hoek van de plafond dan ook een hele schimmelzone vonden!

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Also the bathroom was outdated: it had not been refurbished since the 60s. These years you cannot find any shared bathrooms with all sinks and showers next to each other like this, so that there is no privacy, and it was so cold that you did not even want to shower here. And also here we found mold.

Ook de badkamer was niet van deze tijd: het was sinds de jaren ’60 precies niet meer gerenoveerd geweest. Dezer jaren vind je nergens nog gedeelde badkamers met alle lavabo’s en douches zo naast mekaar dat er geen privacy is, en het was er zo koud dat je je zelfs niet wil douchen. En ook hier vonden we schimmel.

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We gave our cooking up quickly, because in the communal kitchen we could only find pots and pans that looked like they were not washed anymore since years, even though they were. Just worn out, they call it! Time for new ones? Maybe a cheap set at IKEA?! Apparently they never heard of it…

Onze kookplannen gaven we ook snel op, want in de gemeenschappelijke keuken konden we alleen maar potten en pannen terugvinden die eruit zagen alsof ze in geen jaren meer afgewassen waren, al waren ze dat wel. Gewoon versleten, noemen ze dat! Tijd voor nieuw? Wat dacht men van een goedkoop setje bij IKEA?! Blijkbaar nog nooit van gehoord…

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Anyway, it promised to be an adventurous last night, and we decided to go out for dinner and ate a pizza somewhere in town. We were all pretty disappointed with this bitter ending, but the longer we sat there, the more fun we could make of it…

Anyway, het beloofde een avontuurlijke laatste avond te worden, en we zochten dan toch maar een restaurantje op en aten daar een pizza’tje. We waren allemaal vrij teleurgesteld met dit bittere einde, maar zagen er hoe langer, hoe meer de pret van in…

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Eventually we returned to the hotel, we talked about our feelings to the receptionist (about all these unacceptable things we encountered), we got our money back for the stay that night, and we drove back home that very same night. Yes, that means 985 kilometers and 9 hour drive. We would arrive to Gandia in the morning, but with the necessary breaks to change drivers, to drink coffee (to stay awake) and to get some fresh air (also to stay awake) AND not to forget to change the hour again (+1), we finally reached Gandia around noon, the next day.

Uiteindelijk keerden we terug naar het hotel, luchtten we ons hart bij de receptioniste (over al het bovenstaande onaanvaardbare), kregen we ons geld voor het verblijf van die nacht terug, en reden we diezelfde nacht nog terug naar huis. Jawel, dat wil zeggen: 985 kilometer en 9 uur rijden. We zouden tegen de ochtend dan toekomen in Gandia, maar met de nodige pauzes om van chauffeur te wisselen, koffie te drinken (om wakker te blijven) en luchtjes te scheppen (alsook om wakker te blijven) EN niet te vergeten het uur opnieuw te verzetten (+1), kwamen we uiteindelijk pas rond de volgende middag toe in Gandia.

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We were such big zombies that we hardly realized that our trip was done, but I think we had never been so happy to see our own bed and bath again. We slept well all day and came all back together the same evening to celebrate the ending of our great adventure with a dinner at Ula’s place. A few days later we came another time together again, this time to get our final payments done, and it was a perfect reunion!

We waren zulke zombies dat we bijna niet meer realiseerden dat onze trip er dan eindelijk op zat, maar ik denk dat we nog nooit zo blij waren geweest om ons eigen bed en bad terug te zien. We sliepen dan ook allemaal de hele dag lang en kwamen pas ’s avonds laat allemaal terug bij elkaar om het einde van ons grote avontuur af te sluiten met een etentje bij Ula thuis. Enkele dagen later kwamen we vervolgens nog eens bij mekaar, ditmaal om onze eindafrekening te betalen, en dat was de perfecte reünie!

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It was an unforgettable trip with the necessary adventures – as you could read in many posts – and I have great memories of it. What the writing of the posts concerns, I never thought it would be so much work and that it would take such a long time. But perseverance pays off, and I’m proud of myself that I did it! Viva Espana, Viva Portugal! And thanks for reading, now it is really time for something else! The Erasmus life in Gandia, my school events, a crazy trip to the party island of Ibiza, and much more … You will read all of that soon, here at From Julie with Love! ❤

Het was een onvergetelijke trip met de nodige avonturen – zoals je hebt kunt lezen in de vele posts – en ik heb er fantastische herinneringen aan overgehouden. Wat het schrijven van de posts betreft, had ik nooit gedacht dat het zoveel werk zou zijn en dat het zo lang zou duren om alles te posten. Maar de aanhouder wint, en ik ben fier op mezelf dat het me gelukt is! Viva España, Viva Portugal! En bedankt om te lezen, vanaf nu wordt het echt wel tijd voor wat anders! Het Erasmus-leven in Gandia, mijn schoolse gebeurtenissen, een waanzinnige trip naar het party eiland Ibiza, en nog veel meer… Dat lees je vanaf binnenkort, hier bij From Julie with Love! ❤

Travelogue structure / Reisverhaal structuur:

THE BIG TRIP – Day 9: Fátima & Porto

TRAVELOGUE – Blogpost 12: Day 9 (05/4/13) – Fatima & Porto

We were ready for the penultimate day of our big trip. And there were still a lot of kilometers to go on our schedule. We drove from Lisbon to Porto, with a stop in Fatima. Good for aproximately 325 km. But first of course we ate breakfast first at our favorite hostel: Salitre (Lisboa). We left around 9AM and arrived at noon in Fatima, where we consumed our picnic for lunch.

De voorlaatste dag van onze grote reis stond voor de boeg. En er stonden nog véél kilometers op het programma.  We reden van Lissabon naar Porto, met een tussenstop in Fatima. Goed voor zo’n 325 km. Maar eerst aten we natuurlijk nog een stevig ontbijtje in ons favoriete hostel: Salitre (Lisboa). We vertrokken rond 9 uur en kwamen tegen de middag toe in Fatima, waar we dan ook onze picknick verbruikten.

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Why a stopover in Fatima?! // Waarom een tussenstop in Fatima?!

Well, Fatima is a famous pilgrimage site in Portugal. The place is also called “the altar of the world,” because Mary appeared here in 1917 on the 13th of the months of May to October to three shepherd children: Lucia, Francisco and Jacinta.

Wel, Fatima is een bekend bedevaartsoord in Portugal. Deze plaats wordt ook wel eens “het altaar van de wereld” genoemd, omdat Maria hier in 1917 op de 13e van de maanden mei tot oktober verscheen aan drie herderskinderen: Lucia, Francisco en Jacinta.

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At the last appearance the “solar miracle” of Fatima took place, to the sight of the three children and a large crowd of pilgrims. The message of Fatima became a call to prayer and penance.

Bij de laatste verschijning hield  het “zonnewonder” van Fátima plaats, ten aanschouwen van de drie kinderen en een grote menigte pelgrims. De boodschap van Fátima werd een oproep tot gebed en boete.

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The miracle was officially recognized in 1930, and every year many pilgrims came (on foot) to the processions of May 13 and October 13.

Het wonder werd officieel herkend in 1930, en elk jaar komen er veel pelgrims (te voet) naar de processies van 13 mei en 13 oktober.

light18_16701871(example of a busy day in Fátima…)

Unfortunately, we did not visit Fatima on these dates, but we did see the great white basilicas and the huge square in front of them. At the place of the apparition, a “Apparition Chapel” was founded, where typical rituals and celebrations take place every day of the year.

Wij bezochten Fatima helaas niet op deze data, maar zagen wel de grote witte basilieken het enorme plein dat ervoor ligt. Op de plaats van de zogenaamde verschijning is een “Verschijningskapel” gesticht, waar elke dag van die typische rituelen en vieringen plaatsvinden.

BIG TRIP (2) 904Religious or not, it remains a unique experience! But that this hardly 100-year-old story could have bring such a big impact to start such a massive flow of religious tourism, goes far beyond my mind! I still don’t understand. Because … Besides the Basilica, there is nothing else to see in Fatima ….

Gelovig of niet, het blijft een unieke ervaring!  Maar dat het amper 100-jaar oude verhaal zulke invloed kon hebben, en zo’n massale stroom van religieus toerisme op gang kon trekken, dat begrijp ik tot op heden toch nog steeds niet. Want… Naast die basiliek is er NIETS te zien in Fatima….

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Now well, after that somewhat unusual picnic area, we continued driving towards Porto. Upon arrival, we checked in at Oporto City Hostel, a bit out of the city center and certainly not as good as Salitre Hostel in Lisbon, but for just € 10 per night per person, certainly acceptable!

Nu goed, na de ietwat ongewone picknick-plaats, reden we verder richting Porto. Daar checkten we bij aankomst in bij het Oporto City Hostel, een beetje uit het centrum gelegen en zeker niet zo goed als Salitre Hostel in Lissabon, maar voor amper €10 per nacht per persoon, zeker aanvaardbaar!

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At 16.30 we took a FREE CITY TOUR. That’s a walk through the city, accompanied by a local resident that shows the more unusual parts of the city, and above all: for free. At the end of the trip you can give him what you think the tour was worth, and depending on your budget of course. But basically you do not even have to give anything at all…. And the relationship between the tourist and the guide is much more familiar because there are no expectations, and it is not as stiff and formal as a regular citytour. Highly recommendable! (And you can do it now in about every European city.)

Om 16.30u namen we een FREE CITYTOUR. Dat is een stadswandeling, begeleid door een lokale inwoner die de meer ongewone kantjes van de stad laat zien, en bovenal: gratis. Op het einde van de tocht geef je vervolgens gewoon wat jij vindt dat de rondleiding waard was, en naargelang je budget uiteraard. Maar in principe hoef je zelfs niets te geven…. En de relatie tussen toerist-gids is veel kleiner omdat er vrijwel geen verwachtingspatroon bestaat, en het is niet zo officieel en stijfjes. Echt een aanrader! (En je kan het tegenwoordig in zowat elke Europese stad doen.)

BIG TRIP (2) 932Nafisa – Hervé – Ula – Me (Julie) – Christophe

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Our “guide”

During this walk of aproximately two hours we saw a lot of squares, streets, monuments, churches, shops, restaurants, … right away! And we got a lot of great tips to continue our visit in the city.

Tijdens deze wandeling van ongeveer 2 uur zagen we meteen al heel wat pleinen, straten, monumenten, kerken, winkels, restaurantjes, … en kregen we superveel tips om ons bezoek aan de stad verder te zetten.

Some pictures from our visit to Porto // Enkele foto’s van ons bezoek aan Porto:

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Some highlights for me were the Harry Potter bookstore (where the writer JK Rowling got her inspiration, as they say…), the tiled trainstation and the view from the bridge overlooking the citycenter.

Enkele hoogtepunten waren voor mij de Harry Potter boekenwinkel (waar de schrijfster JK Rowling haar inspiratie op deed, naar verluidt…), het betegelde treinstation en het uitzicht vanop de brug over de binnenstad.

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After this trip we returned – pretty tired – back to our hostel. They say “it is the last straw that breaks the camel’s back”, and our trip was almost over …

Na dit stevige tochtje keerden we dan ook redelijk vermoeid terug naar ons hostel. De laatste loodjes wegen het zwaarst en onze trip zat er bijna  op…

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But it did not prevent us from going out for dinner once more, after days of picnics and cooking in hostels! And we went to a local restaurant that night. Relaxing!

Maar het belette ons er niet van om nog eens uit eten te gaan, dat hadden we na dagenlang picknicken en koken wel weer verdiend! En we zochten een lokaal restaurantje op waar we even lekker konden uitblazen.

BIGtrip_04-05 2471It was another long but incredibly beautiful day, and I do not have to tell you that we slept very well again!

Het werd dus weer een lange maar ongelooflijk mooie dag, en ik hoef jullie niet te vertellen dat we weer heel goed sliepen! 

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Exhausted! // Oververmoeid!

The next day we would continue our visit to Porto, because we really like it here. Soooooo much different from Lisbon, much more charming and characterful. But more about that in the next blog post, which you can read later on… About the old town and the famous Port houses, the wine we tasted in one of the many wineries.

De volgende dag zouden we ons bezoek aan Porto nog even verderzetten, want het beviel ons echt enorm hier. Héééééél wat anders dan Lissabon, veel charmanter en karaktervol. Maar meer daarover in de volgende blogpost, waarin je meer kunt lezen over de historische binnenstad én het bekendste uit Porto: de Porto-wijn die we proefden in één van de vele wijnhuizen.

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So see you SOON, for the last post!!

Tot binnenkort, voor de laatste post!!!

Julie

Travelogue structure / Reisverhaal structuur:

  • Blogpost 1: Introduction
  • Blogpost 2: Day 1 (28/3/13) – Altea
  • Blogpost 3: Day 1 (28/3/13) – Benidorm
  • Blogpost 4: Day 2 (29/3/13) – Alicante
  • Blogpost 5: Day 3 (30/3/13) – Granada
  • Blogpost 6: Day 4 (31/3/13) – Malaga
  • Blogpost 7: Day 4 (31/3/13) – Ronda
  • Blogpost 8: Day 5 (01/4/13) – Gibraltar
  • Blogpost 9: Day 6 (02/4/13) – Albufeira
  • Blogpost 10: Day 7 (03/4/13) – Lisbon
  • Blogpost 11: Day 8 (04/4/13) – Sintra & Lisbon
  • Blogpost 12: Day 9 (05/4/13) – Fatima & Porto=> you’re now reading this blogpost!
  • Blogpost 13: Day 10 (06/4/13) – Porto & Braga

P.S.: Some of the pictures in this post are taken by my friend and awesome photographer, Ula. Thank you! ;-)